A New Season


After a long sabbatical, I plan to post new snippets with some holiday recipes from around the world. May your upcoming holiday preparations be interesting and fun. Stay happy and healthy until I write again.

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Indian Pudding (sugar free)


Maple syrup houses

Maple syrup houses (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The First Thanksgiving, painted by Jean Leon G...

I often made a version of this Thanksgiving pudding in honor of the Native Americans who shared the first American Thanksgiving that took place close to my home at Plymouth, Massachusetts.  It is an old American tradition to have this simple pudding during this autumn season, but in these modern times, it has fallen out of favor to be replaced by packaged pudding mixes.  It’s very easy to make and would make a good addition to the Thanksgiving table.  Serve it up with some sugar-free dairy whipped topping or a dietetic ice cream for an almost authentic diabetic treat.

INDIAN PUDDING:

1/4 cup cornmeal

2 cups milk

1/3 cup thick sugar-free maple syrup

1 egg, beaten

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1 Tablespoon margarine (60% oil content) or butter if desired

1/4 cup raisins

1/4 cup finely chopped walnuts

1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix together the milk, salt and margarine.  Scald this mixture by bringing it to a rapid boil.  Mix the cornmeal into the milk mixture slowly.  Cook in a double boiler for about 15 minutes until mixture is thick.  Add maple syrup, beaten egg,  salt, cinnamon, and raisins.  Add chopped walnuts and mix thoroughly.  Put into pan that has been sprayed with butter flavored cooking spray and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for approximately two hours.  Pudding should be slightly firm and knife inserted should be slightly dry.  Serve cold or slightly warm.

Thanksgiving Will Soon Be Here (with diabetic recipe)


English: "The First Thanksgiving at Plymo...

English: “The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth” (1914) By Jennie A. Brownscombe (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The holiday of American Thanksgiving soon approaches, this year falling on Thursday, November 22nd.  This is the time to start thinking about buying your turkey.  The turkey sales at your local supermarket will be coming up soon and, if that is your choice of a entree this year, it would be a good time to consider what type it will be, whether it be a frozen, fresh, Kosher or pre-basted.  The choices in many markets are endless.  I’ll bring you more information on choosing and preparing a turkey at a later date.  In the meantime, here is a little quote and a recipe which can be used interchangeably for a variety of holidays,  be it Halloween, Thanksgiving, Rosh Hashannah, Christmas or New Year or any other special occasion.  Feel free to give the sugar-free, diabetic recipe a try.  I like it a lot and use it on a weekday basis.

Ah! On Thanksgiving day, when from East and from West,

From North and from South come the pilgrim and guest,

When the gray-haired New Englander sees round his board

The old broken links of affection restored,

When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more,

And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled before,

What moistens the lip and what brightens the eye?

What calls back the past, like the rich pumpkin pie?

_________________________________________________________________________________________

CRANBERRY NUT CRUNCH BRITTLE

1 cup dry sugar substitute (cup for cup measure)

3/4 cup salted nuts (such as peanuts, cashews, almonds, or macadamia), chopped coursely

1/2 dried cranberries

1/2 cup sugar-free maple syrup

1 teaspoon margarine or butter

1 teaspoon baking soda

teaspoon vanilla extract (not imitation)

Spray a large rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray or butter it.  Taking a very large, heat-proof glass measuring bowl, mix the maple syrup and the dry sugar substitute and microwave on High Power for 4 1/2 minutes.  Add the margarine or butter and the vanilla extract, mixing well to combine.  Continue to microwave for 1  1/2 minutes.  Mix in the baking soda.  Stir thoroughly until the mixture becomes light and airy.  It should foam a bit.  Pour the hot mixture onto the baking sheet.  Place the baking sheet on a heat-proof kitchen surface such as a wire baking rack.  Cool for 1 hour.  Break into pieces and store in tins or other sealed container.  Makes 8 servings.

140 calories

7 grams Fat

5 grams Carbohydrate

170 grams Sodium

3 grams Protein

8 mg. Calcium

1 gram Fiber

Happy Holidays to all!

Diabetic Oatmeal Cookies


yes, i FINALLY made cookies again. it's been y...

Below is an older recipe that my mother had in her recipe box.  Even though she was being treated for a heart condition, she had many low or sugar-free and fat free recipes in her collection.  I always stole some of these after working all day and would ruin my dinner having just a few too many.  I’ve adapted them to be more diabetic friendly by replacing some of the sugar with dry sugar substitute and lessening some of the fat.

36 cookies

45 min preparation time

Heat oven to 350 degrees.  Spray large baking sheet very lightly with cooking spray.

INGREDIENTS

3/4 cup margarine, softened

1 cup dry sugar substitute (Splenda for  Baking)

1/2 cup brown sugar

2 medium eggs

1 teaspoon vanilla extract (pure vanilla is best)

3 cups old-fashioned oats

1  1/2  cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon of salt

3/4 cups raisins

Cream margerine, sugar substitute and brown sugar until light and fluffy.  Add eggs and vanilla and mix well.  Blend in oats, baking soda and salt, then add the flour.  Blend thoroughly until of stiff consistency.  Add raisins and mix completely.

Chill dough to make it easier to handle.  Roll the dough into ball (36 portions) and flatten with a glass dipped in water and powdered sugar.

Bake at 350 degrees for 10-12 minutes.  Cookies should be lightly browned. Do not overcook.

Remove  cookies from baking sheet to wire rack. Let cool.

Serving size: 1 cookie

Total fat 5.9 grams   Cholesterol  25 mg.    Sodium   141 grams       Protein  2.0 grams      Carbs  17.1 grams    Sugar 4.3 grams

calories  76

I always like to have a few of these cookies for my bedtime snack with a glass of milk.

Please refer to your diabetic diet plan or ask your nutritionist for the proper amount of cookies you may have.

Enjoy!

Pork Chops and Apples


This is a good recipe that I use often that I originally got from ‘The Art of Cooking for the Diabetic’.  I have changed the original recipe somewhat to account for my own personal taste.  I’ve added a touch of … Continue reading